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by: 
cindy

It’s not every day someone says, “You changed my life!”  But that’s exactly what Charles Armstrong is saying about the librarians at Lakewood Library.  Listen to Charles’ message.

Charles chooses to make the Lakewood Library his home library because of the unparalleled service he receives from the librarians.  Charles moved to the Denver area about five years ago. He is a steelworker who recently had been struggling to find work.  He came to the library seeking help with his resume and job search when experiences associate Lindsay Masciotti asked him to tell her about himself.  She asked him what he missed most about his home state of Alabama in an effort to get to know him better. When he replied, “Grits! You just can’t find good grits in Colorado!” This gave Lindsay an idea on how to help him stand out from the crowd and capture a potential employer’s attention.  

Lindsay suggested he insert some of his story into his cover letter. Charles followed her advice and included more of his personal story in his cover letter, sharing his love of grits, how steelworkers have grit, and how that grit makes him the perfect candidate for a steel working job.

Teen services librarian Marie McColley, patron experience associate Brianna Francis, and adult services librarian Lynn Gunderson continued to advise him on how to finalize his resume, post his cover letter and resume online, scan training certificates, while offering moral support.

Shortly after posting his information on steelworker job sites, he began to capture employers’ attention.  The next day he had an interview and then an offer of employment. He accepted the job offer and began to make plans for his temporary move. The next day he received three more offers for employment, then another two, and the offers continue to trickle in.

People often only think of libraries as places to find toddlers during story times or students doing research.  Sometimes, they forget the role libraries play in the economic well-being of a community. Libraries are the trusted repositories of knowledge and information, and it is that knowledge and creativity that help drive productivity and economic health. Today’s library is a lively community center with patrons of all ages and stations in life actively engaged with a wide variety of print and electronic media, library staff and each other. Today’s libraries are a dynamic part of a community’s learning infrastructure and support economic development.

Libraries support the economic health of their communities by:

  • Supporting early literacy and education;
  • Contributing to a technologically literate workforce;
  • Providing critical resources for job seekers;
  • Supporting local businesses and startups;
  • Anchoring commercial developments and redevelopments; and
  • Contributing to a community’s quality of life.

At the time of this writing, Charles has moved to Cincinnati for the next six months to work and complete his next professional job building buildings and bridges, adding his own personal touch of grit to each of his projects.

by: 
mackenzie

Teen Read Week™ is a national adolescent literacy initiative created by the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA). It began in 1998 and is held annually in October to encourage teens to be regular readers and library users. We’re kicking off Teen Read Week by highlighting some of the programs and opportunities Jeffco Library offers exclusively for teens.

Teen Advisory Board

We include actual teenagers in the decisions we make regarding teen programming and materials. Every library has its own TAB (Teen Advisory Board), a group of teens interested in becoming more involved in their library and community. These teens work with our Teen Services staff to give input on library YA collections, contribute to the Teen blog, help create teen programming, volunteer at events, organize community service projects, and influence how their library serves teens. Want to learn more about joining your local TAB? Just ask your local Teen librarian. 

Teen Blog Submission

We love highlighting our teens’ amazing talent! Teens can submit their original creative writing, editorials, book/movie reviews, photography, or artwork to be featured on our Teen Blog. Check out what’s been posted recently and submit your own work.

Movie Passes

Our Teen Services Coordinator has incredible connections that get our teens exclusive access to FREE passes to advanced screenings of hot movies, like Goosebumps and Me & Earl & The Dying Girl. Join her email list so you can learn about upcoming advanced screening passes too! 

After Dark Events

Ever wonder what your local library’s like after hours? Many of our libraries become TEEN ONLY zones once a month by offering programing that takes place after we’ve kicked everyone else out of the library. Find an After Dark event at your library.  

Tutoring

Teens can get homework help from Colorado School of Mines student volunteers every Wednesday and Thursday at the Golden Library.

Special Events

Our Teen Services staff puts on more programs and events for teens than we can count; LEGO Clubs, movie nights, writing workshops, and more! See all our Teen events right here

 

You can learn more about Teen Read Week and join the conversation about it on Twitter with #TRW15.

 

by: 
cindy

Halloween is lurking just around the corner. We love this holiday and have a hauntingly fun list of events to get you in the spirit. 

Columbine
Join us throughout the month for terrifying treats and haunted horrors on the big screen. DO dress up as your favorite spooky specter so the other monsters don't think you're just a tasty tidbit. And speaking of tasty tidbits, feel free to bring your own snacks to enjoy and share with our other ghoulish guests.

11:30 a.m. Saturday, October 24 - Poltergeist (PG)
2 p.m. Saturday, October 24 - Hotel Transylvania (PG) - This movie is part of our Family Movie Matinee series.
10:30 a.m. Saturday, October 31 - Universal Monster Movie Marathon

Evergreen
Teens, 11-18, join us for a Halloween party with plenty of spooky activities and light snacks. Don't forget to dress up. The best costume wins a prize!

6:30 p.m. Friday, October 30

Golden
Twisted Tales: A Murder in Wonderland. There’s been a murder in Wonderland and you need to solve it. Don’t be late for this very thrilling date. Murder Mystery written and performed by teens.

6:00 p.m., Friday, October 23
Grades 6 – 12. Costumes required, cosplay encouraged. Register online.

Lakewood
Join the Lakewood Library staff for spooky stories, crafts, and other fun activities. Great for young children.

6:30 p.m. Thursday, October 29

Arvada, Belmar, Columbine, Edgewater
Superhero Training Academy

Calling all Superheroes! It’s time to decide if you’re a bird, a plane or… [make something up!]. Visit your favorite library to enroll in Superhero Training Academy. Enjoy heroic stories and create your own identity. Make a costume and start training for super exploits. Hang out and compare your super power with other superheroes too. Who knows, you could save the world! Registration is required. Free tickets available one week before the program.  Go online to jeffcolibrary.org or call 303-235-5275 (JCPL). Ages 5 -10.

  • 5 p.m. Tuesday, October 20 – Edgewater
  • 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, October 21 - Golden
  • 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, October 21 - Evergreen
  • 6:30 p.m.  Tuesday, October 27 - Arvada
  • 3:30 p.m. Thursday, October 29 – Belmar
  • 3:30 p.m. Friday, November 13 - Standley Lake
  • 6 p.m. Monday, November 16 – Columbine

Standley Lake
Spooky Stories with a Grin
7 p.m. Friday, October 30
Age 6+. Free tickets available one week prior.

Don't get spooked. Do get in the mood and enjoy Halloween with Jeffco Library!

by: 
cindy

This week we hosted author and education specialist Rae Pica as the guest speaker at an event for parents, teachers, educators and childcare providers.

The Movin’ and Groovin’ event kicks off a month of special events for our littlest patrons. Throughout October and November our locations are hosting Movin’ and Groovin’ Fests to put into action some of the strategies to help get every child read to read when they start school.

Rae shared some of her favorite strategies and we want to share them with you.

Take a Listening Walk.
Walk with your child. Even as a baby in a stroller, talk to your baby as you walk along.  Use words to describe the sounds you hear along the way. Your baby is absorbing it all as he processes his environment.  Ask your toddler to listen for the natural sounds of birds, wind, or dogs barking. Then ask them to listen for the human sounds of cars, laughter, and construction.

Use music to encourage active listening.
Those childhood favorite songs, like BINGO or Heads-Shoulders-Knees and Toes, and Old McDonald, are key to helping young children learn sequencing, body movement and awareness, and patterns.

Play musical games.
Toddlers and preschoolers love musical games that get their bodies and minds engaged. Add a twist to the old favorite “musical chairs” by asking kids to freeze like a statue when the music stops, or play musical partners, giving their friend a hug when the music stops playing.

Talk – sing, whisper, shout!
Sing, chant, and mix it up by having the children say their name different ways.  Have them chant their name to learn rhythm. Have them say their name fast and then slow to practice tempo. Have them say if softly in a whisper, then shouting to learn volume. Have them sing their name to put it all in action.

You’ve got to move it, move it!
Ask children to move differently when saying their name in fun ways. As they whisper their names, have them put that quiet movement into action by tiptoeing. When they shout it, ask them to stomp each syllable/beat.  When they sing their name, encourage them to dance it.

Sky write!
Imagine your finger is a giant crayon, and then ask the children to “draw” in the air the first letter of their name. Start big, then go smaller, and smaller.  Get creative by using different parts of your body. Have them try writing the letter as if their bellybutton held the crayon, or their head.  The giggles will come out, but without any pressure.  Skywriting encourages movement, helps kids understand straight versus curvy lines, all without pressure since it’s not permanent and mistakes can’t be seen.

Play balloon volleyball.
There’s no better way to build eye-hand coordination (a prerequisite to writing!) than by playing volleyball with a balloon. Or through a chiffon scarf into the air and encourage the children to catch it. Nobody gets hurt, but they’ll be developing that precious coordination they’ll need later to hold a pencil and write.

All of these strategies of free language and movement help promote directionality and spatial awareness for children. They build word comprehension and future literacy skills. As Rae said when she wrapped up her presentation, “the best way to teach a child to write is to let them play at the playground. Gross motor skills must be developed before fine motor skills can be honed.”

You can find some of Rae’s books in our libraries and we encourage you to bring the family to one of our Movin’ and Groovin’ Fests.

Oh, one last thing…we’d like to thank the Jefferson County Library Foundation for supporting the Movin’ and Groovin’ event this week! Their support of our programs made the evening possible.

by: 
mackenzie

It's the second week of our partnership with Foothills Animal Shelter for Dogtoberfest! Learn more about the adorable animals in this post by calling 303-278-7575 or by going here. 

One-year-old Brody is an Australian Cattledog mix with an adventurous soul. Since he is looking for someone to teach him about the world and show him how beautiful it can be, we think he’ll love reading Explore Colorado: A Naturalist's Notebook while he waits to meet the perfect hiking companion. Brody’s pet ID number is 159704 if you want to be his new owner! 

Meet one-year-old Tara, a loving German Shepherd mix. She has a calm spirit, but is curious about the world around her and is looking for someone who enjoys the little things in life, like scratching her back and reading Small Pleasures: Finding Grace In a Chaotic World. Tara’s animal ID is 162744, come visit with her today!

Roni is an affectionate seven-year-old Chihuahua mix who wants a serene lifestyle. She wants to curl up on your lap while you read or watch TV and we think she’ll enjoy reading the first book in The Southern Vampire Series (which spawned the show True Blood) Dead Until Dark. Roni’s animal ID number is 160048, if you want to read with her.  

Five-year-old Loki is a friendly American Pit Bull mix with an outgoing personality. He loves being outside and wants someone to discover new places with him. We think he'll enjoy Get Outside Guide: All Things Adventure, Exploration, and Fun! If you want to go exploring with Loki, his animal ID number is 162403.

Cute Critter Extra

Lovey Dove is a 25-year-old Dove with a love of music! He loves to hang out around the house listening to tunes and being with people, which is why we think he’ll love listening to Beyond the Horizon: A Selection of the Best Music From Around the World. If you want to share this passion for music with him, Lovey Dove’s animal ID number is 162850.

by: 
mackenzie

October is National Adopt-A-Dog Month! We’ve teamed up with the folks at Foothills Animal Shelter to create reading recommendations for some of their adoptable dogs. You can learn more about the dogs featured in this post by visiting www.FoothillsAnimalShelter.org or calling 303-278-7575.

Three-month-old Chihuahua mix, Melvin, is curious about everything and wants to have someone show him around! Since he’s also a great snuggler, we think he’ll enjoy cuddling up with someone and reading Stanley at School by Linda Bailey. Melvin’s pet ID is 153102 if you want to meet him! 

Meet June Bug! This 6-month old American Bulldog mix is looking for someone to keep her company! She has a passion for the outdoors and people, and she loves giving kisses. We think she’d love reading about a girl and her dog’s autumnal adventures in Jung-Hee Spetter’s Lily and Trooper’s Fall. If you want to learn more about June Bug, her pet ID is 162703.

Say hello to Merlin! He’s in search of an active, high energy home where his outgoing and affectionate nature will be appreciated. Since he seems like the perfect hiking companion, we thought he’d like Hiking and Backpacking with Dogs by Linda B. Mullally. He'll be sure to find and share some tips with his new owners. Merlin’s pet ID is 153102 if you’d like to meet with him. 

This is Kaiser and he just wants to play all day. He’s a one-year-old Rottweiler mix seeking an adventurous buddy with whom he can explore the great outdoors. We think he’ll be able to appreciate the adventures in Sophie: The Incredible True Story of the Castaway Dog by Emma Pearse. Want to discuss the book with Kaiser? His pet ID is 162653.   

Cute Critter Extra! 

This adorable Chinese dwarf hamster is Mamay. She can be a little shy, but she’s very nice and easy to handle. She likes to burrow deep down in her bedding. We think she’ll enjoy reading about other animals' cuddling habits in Can You Cuddle a Koala? by John Butler. Mamay’s pet ID is 160965 if you want to cuddle up with her.  

by: 
carol

There’s been a murder in Wonderland and you need to solve it. Don’t be late for this very thrilling date. Murder Mystery written and performed by teens.

Costumes required, cosplay encouraged. Register now!

6 p.m. Friday, October 23 

Golden Library

Grades 6 – 12

by: 
carol

At Jeffco Library, “free speech” is part of our DNA. With the election just a few short weeks away, we remind you of the important role libraries have always played in the democratic process. Libraries are perhaps one of the last bastions of free speech. Stop by your favorite library location this time of the year and you’ll see a table chock-full with information about everything from candidates to ballot measures. Pick up a pamphlet. Leaf through a leaflet. Take the Citizen’s Guide compiled by the League of Women Voters of Jefferson County. The bottom line is, we encourage you to learn more about the election so you can make an informed decision.

The sign on our election information table includes the following excerpt:

Opinions expressed in the literature on this table do not represent the views of, and are not endorsed by, Jefferson County Public Library.

That said, we certainly DO endorse expressing opinions; and, most importantly, voting!

by: 
cindy

It’s not something any of us like to talk about, but if you ask around, most of have in one way or another been impacted by suicide.

In Colorado, for young people between the ages of 10 and 19, suicide is the second leading cause of death. There are many effective suicide prevention programs in our community that can help. The Second Wind Fund helps in a different way by connecting young people at risk of suicide with licensed therapists to help them discover hope and healing in their lives. You can learn more about warning signs and risk factors, as well as the Second Wind Fund at a presentation on Monday, September 21, 6:30 p.m. at the Columbine Library.

Presented by Second Wind Fund.

6:30 p.m. Monday, September 21  

by: 
cindy

Did you know that fingerspelling has a strong correlation to reading? Fingerspelling is using your hands to represent letters or numbers. Join us and gain an understanding of the relationship between fingerspelling and reading in promoting literacy. Researchers Nancy Bridenbaugh and Rachel Bol will share findings and tips on incorporating fingerspelling in the daily activities of children both deaf and hard of hearing.  

Fingerspelling: A Pathway to Reading
6 p.m. Thursday, October 1
Belmar Library

The Center on Literacy and Deafness is funded by a grant from the US Department of Education Institute of Education Sciences (Award #R24C120001).

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