Sept. 1 - All libraries will be closed for Labor Day.

Home > Teen > Teen Blog

Teen Blog

by: 
Tana, Arvada Library

Trapped inside a chain superstore by an apocalyptic sequence of natural and human disasters, six high school kids from various popular and unpopular social groups struggle for survival while protecting a group of younger children.

OMG! OMG! OMG!

Ok. Look. By the middle of the second page I was in it to win it with this book.  Not sure if it’s the locality of the story (Colorado Springs), if it’s the ages of the characters (first graders through high school) or if it is the crazy-non-stop-tell-me-this-can-not-ever-happen-here--WHAT!?-it-might-happen-next-week-OMG! aspect that made Monument 14 by Emmy Laybourne so riveting for me, but… HOLY COW.

I’ll tell you what, though… my new end of the world survival plan includes a Super Target now.  ‘Nuff said.

by: 
Briana, Evergreen Library

Set in the not-too-distant future, Robopocalypse describes a world in which robots have made our lives a lot easier – they fight our wars, clean our homes, and drive our cars. Then, under the control of a childlike yet sinister artificial intelligence called Archos, the robots turn against humanity in a terrifying and bloody attack known as Zero Hour. A group of international survivors – including a Japanese scientist, a London hacker, and a cop on an Oklahoma Indian reservation – stage an inventive counterattack in this action-packed thriller. The author, Daniel H. Wilson, has a PhD in robotics, so the story is full of astonishing technical detail. His latest novel, Amped, is also available. Fans of World War Z and other dystopian thrillers should give this one a try!

by: 
Arra, Lakewood Library

Did you see the movie / read the book Life of Pi?  Want to read some other books that give you a good sense of Indian culture and life?  Try some of these great reads:

Tiger's Curse by Colleen Houck
Seventeen-year-old Oregon teenager Kelsey forms a bond with a circus tiger who is actually one of two brothers, Indian princes Ren and Kishan, who were cursed to live as tigers for eternity, and she travels with him to India where the tiger's curse may be broken once and for all.

Karma by Cathy Ostlere
After her mother's suicide, Maya and her Sikh father travel to New Delhi from Canada to place her mother's ashes in their final resting place. On the night of their arrival, Prime Minister Indira Gandhi is assassinated.  Maya and her father are separated when the city erupts in chaos, and Maya must rely on Sandeep, a boy she has just met, for survival.

Anila's Journey by Mary Finn
In late eighteenth-century Calcutta, half-Indian half-Irish Anila Tandy finds herself alone with nothing but her artistic talent to rely on, searching for her father who is presumed dead.

Climbing the Stairs by Padma Venkatraman
In India, in 1941, when her father becomes brain-damaged in a non-violent protest march, fifteen-year-old Vidya and her family are forced to move in with her father's extended family and become accustomed to a totally different way of life.

Born Confused by Tanuja Desai Hidier
Dimple, whose family is from India, discovers that she is not Indian enough for the Indians and not American enough for the Americans. Where does she fit in when she is constantly pulled between these two opposing cultures?

by: 
Arra, Lakewood Library

February is African American History Month.  In celebration of this event here are a few amazing African American scientists:

George Washington Carver- From cosmetics to gasoline, Carver found more uses for the peanut than you might imagine.  Carver moved around quite a bit as a youth and often did a variety of odd jobs.  With this well-rounded education, both practical and from formal colleges like Simpson and the Agricultural College in Ames Iowa, he used his knowledge of chemistry and agriculture to try to improve the situation for poor southern farmers.

Percy Lavon Julian - Julian discovered a method to extract hormones and steroids from plants.  This discovery brought the cost of medicine down significantly and helped relieve everything from glaucoma to helping with fertility.  He also invented a fire fighting foam that was used in World War II.

Annie J. Easly - Best known for her work on the NASA Centaur rocket project, Easly joined NASA at the beginning of the space age. She wrote computer code that evaluated substitute power technologies, helped launch Centaur, identified wind, solar and other energy projects for NACA (now called NASA). She also helped invent other systems to solve energy problems.

Want to know more?  Check out our online database Science in Context.

 

by: 
Pam, Standley Lake Library

Beautiful Creatures, based on the teen best seller by Kami Garcia, is set to release Feb. 13th. It’s a dreamy, southern gothic romance. The story is set in Gaitlin, South Carolina. Gaitlin is a typical small southern town where everyone knows everyone else’s business. Ethan, 16, and still reeling from the loss of his mother the previous year, begins having nightmares. Every night he wakes sweating and terrified from a dream of a girl who mysteriously slips from his hand and drowns in a pool of water. Can you guess what happens next? Yes, the girl from his dreams, Lena, moves to town. She is mysterious and lives with her reclusive uncle. She’s also a caster, aka witch, whose path will be chosen for her when she turns 16--a path toward darkness or a path toward the light.

by: 
Pam, Standley Lake Library

Humans and dragons engineered a fragile peace nearly forty years ago, but as the anniversary of the treaty nears, tensions escalate with covert factions on both sides instigating war. Seraphina, an unusually gifted musician, hides not only the extent of her talent but her heritage. Dragons can assume human form and a few live among the people of Goerdd as ambassadors and scholars; they are mathematical, rational and precise musicians, but they disdain emotion. Seraphina is half-dragon and half-human, something that everyone else presumes impossible. She must hide her true nature at risk of death for herself and her father, but her knowledge of dragons is uncanny. When the Crown Prince is murdered, Princess Glisselda and her betrothed, Prince Lucien rely on Seraphina’s courage and knowledge, drawing her deeper into an intrigue rooted in treason.

Vivid world-building at its best, Seraphina is an adventure that tests the boundaries of love, loyalty and what it means to be human.

by: 
Arra, Lakewood Library

Anya doesn’t fit in a school or home.  Her mom wants her to respect her Russian immigrant roots but she wants to be a normal American teen.  When she falls down the well in the park she finally gains a best friend, one that has been dead since 1918. Emily may have been dead for a century but she is determined to help Anya transform into a popular girl at school.  As the saying goes, the grass isn’t always greener on the other side of the fence and sinister secrets follow Emily from the grave.  This is a well drawn story with images that perfectly capture what it is to feel like an awkward teen trying to fit in.  I loved this story from start to finish.

 

by: 
Arra, Lakewood Library

It may be a mouthful to say but it is also one of the most beautiful natural phenomenon on this planet.  A librarian at Lakewood just got back from Greenland where she spent 4 days (or nights in her case) watching the northern lights. 

What creates these amazing light shows in the sky?  When electrically charged particles from solar flares enter the earth's atmosphere they collide with oxygen, nitrogen and other gasses to turn into light.  Think of it like a giant neon lamp in the sky.  These auroras are typically seen at the poles because the magnetic field of the earth generally repels these particles.  South auroras are called Aurora Australis.  These light shows take place at 60 to 200 miles above the earth and may sometimes go even higher. The color is generally green but may appear in other shades as well.

Want to know more?  Check out Science in Context to read more or watch videos.

by: 
Arra, Lakewood Library

There have been a lot of advances in robotic design in the last few years.   Here are some teen titles that take a look into what robots of the future might look like:

Girl Parts by John M. Cusick - Do you have a hard time talking to girls?  Ever feel lonely?  David's parents buy him a companion bot to "encourage healthy human interaction." 

Cinder by Melissa Marr - Cinder, a gifted mechanic and cyborg, becomes involved with handsome Prince Kai and must uncover secrets about her past in order to save the world.

Eager by Helen Fox - The Bell family's new robot, Eager, is programmed to not merely obey but to question, reason, and exercise free will. When the ultra high-tech, eerily human BDC4 robots begin to behave suspiciously, Eager and the Bells are drawn into a great adventure that is sometimes dark and often humorous.

The Robot by Paul E Watson - Gabe and his best friend Dover crack the code to the forbidden laboratory of Gabe's father, unwittingly unleashing T.R.I.N.A., a beautiful blonde robot programmed with a mission that the two boys must put to a stop.

I Robot by Issac Asimov This is the ultimate classic robot book.  Asimov explores the idea of robots becoming an intrinsic part of our society.  What happens when they try to take over the world?

by: 
Jessie, Columbine Library

ABC Family recently announced that they are working on two TV series based on teen books. I think they are still in the very beginning stages, so we'll need to wait and see what happens. In the meantime, you may want to try the books.

Recovery Road by Blake Nelson: While she is in a rehab facility for drug and alcohol abuse, Maddie meets Stewart, and they begin a relationship. They try to maintain this relationship (and stay sober) after they both get out.

Juliet Immortal by Stacey Jay: For seven hundred years, the souls of Romeo and Juliet have repeatedly inhabited the bodies of newly deceased people to battle to the death as sworn enemies, until they meet for the last time as two Southern California high school students. (By the way, I love the cover blurb for this one, which says "The greatest love story ever told is a lie.")

Have you read either of these books? Would you watch the show for either?

Pages

Subscribe to Teen Blog