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by: 
Erin, Golden Library

Why be the sheep when you can be the wolf?

Seventeen-year-old Ismae escapes from a brutal arranged marriage to the convent of St. Mortain, where the nuns still serve the gods of old. Here she learns that the god of Death Himself has blessed her with dangerous gifts—and a violent destiny. If she chooses to stay at the convent, she will be trained as an assassin and serve as a handmaiden to Death. Ismae’s latest assignment takes her straight into the high court of 15th century Brittany—where she finds herself woefully under prepared—not only for the deadly games of conspiracy and treason, but for the impossible choices she must make. For how can she deliver Death’s vengeance upon a target who, against her will, has stolen her heart?

This book had everything: a strong heroine, a dashing hero, suspense, romance and intrigue. Ismae is a really engaging character who faces some tough choices. Will she follow her heart or her orders? If you like this one, check out the second in the series Dark Triumph.  

by: 
Jessie, Columbine Library

Vampire Academy, the story of vampire princess Lissa and her guardian-in-training Rose, is finally going to make it to the big screen. The first book in the series starts two years after a horrible incident made Rose and Lissa run away. Now they have been found and returned to St. Vladimir's Academy, where one focuses on mastering magic and the other on physical training, and all students work to retain some part of their humanity despite their bloodsucking nature.

The movie features Zoey Deutch (who was in Beautiful Creatures) as Rose and Lucy Fry as Lissa, and also stars Sarah Hyland from Modern Family as their friend Natalie. It's scheduled to come out on February 14, 2014. Happy Valentine's Day to us all!

by: 
Jessie, Columbine Library

Looking for something new to read? Of course you are! Try one of these ghost books:

Paper Valentine by Brenna Yovanoff: Hannah and her best friend Lillian (recently deceased) team up to investigate a series of gruesome murders.

In the Shadow of Blackbirds by Cat Winters: It's 1918 and San Fransisco is riddled with death, thanks to deadly influenza and World War I. Mary Shelley Black watches desperate mourners flock to séances and spirit photographers for comfort and must consider if ghosts are real when her first love returns.

The Haunting of Apartment 101 by Megan Atwood: This is the first in The Paranormalists series. Jinx and Jackson have worked hard to start their ghost hunting business. The next step is, of course, finding some business. When a popular classmate asks them to investigate a haunting at her father's apartment, Jackson convinces Jinx to investigate, despite her skepticism. 

Through Her Eyes by Jennifer Archer: Tansy just moved for the millionth time, this time into her grandfather's old house. Everything is different here, including her passion for photography. When she looks through her camera lens, she sees people that aren't really there.

The Ghost of Graylock by Dan Poblocki: Neil and his sister Bree, along with their new friends Wesley and Eric, set out to explore Greylock Hall, an abandoned psychiatric hospital which is supposed to be haunted by the ghost of Nurse Janet.

 

by: 
Pam, Standley Lake Library


By Ji-Elle

Have you ever wanted to get a tattoo?  Now is your opportunity to get a temporary tattoo with henna!  Create your own design and then temporarily tattoo it with Henna.  Henna is a dye created with the crushed leaves of the Henna bush. 

Standley Lake Library
Saturday, June 15th
2:00-3:30 P.M.

by: 
Briana, Evergreen Library

Orleans starts with an intriguing question: what if Hurricane Katrina was only the beginning?

In this futuristic sci-fi story, the 2005 storm is followed by a series of increasingly devastating hurricanes. Living conditions become horrific for those who choose to stay on the Gulf Coast, and by 2025 the outbreak of a deadly plague called Delta Fever prompts the U.S. government to quarantine the entire region. Fast forward a few more decades, and the survivors in Orleans live in tribes according to blood type - a characteristic more important than any other, as blood type dictates one's susceptibility to Delta Fever.

When 15 year-old Fen's tribal leader, Lydia, dies just after giving birth, Fen commits herself to honoring Lydia's wish that her child make it to the Outer States - the place beyond the wall that separates Orleans from the U.S. Along the way she meets Daniel, a young scientist who illegally crossed the wall and believes he can find a cure to Delta Fever.

Orleans is told through alternating viewpoints, and though Fen's native dialect is tricky at first, it does not detract from the power of the story. This is a fast-paced adventure with compelling themes - climate change, racism, and human survival.

by: 
Arra, Lakewood Library
by: 
Briana, Evergreen Library

Every spring, we at the Evergreen reference desk get scores of questions about daily life in Shakespearean England. What did ordinary people wear? How did life in the country differ from life in the city? What holidays did people celebrate? Nerd Alert: I love these questions. They give me an opportunity to use one of my favorite databases, Daily Life Through History.

Daily Life Through History covers thousands of years of history in virtually every corner of the world, from the Australian Aborigines of 10,000 years ago to 1943’s Zoot Suit Riots. It includes articles on eras and analysis of historical events and culture. Within each era are articles about families, entertainment, literature, and other aspects of domestic life. You can browse topics or search for specific information. Plus, there are photos, maps, and videos, too. Next time you have a daunting project for history or English, ask your friendly librarian about Daily Life Through History.

by: 
Tana, Arvada Library

ANOTHER Shakespeare movie?!  Yes, indeed!  And this one is directed by Joss Whedon, of Marvel Avenger's, Serenity, Dr. Horrible's Sing-along Blog, and Toy Story fame.  He is a multi-talented guy who writes scripts and comic books as well as directs. Some of his more notable comic books include Astonishing X-Men, Runaways, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and Angel: After the Fall

So why Shakespeare?  Why not!?  Much Ado About Nothing, written over 400 years ago, is one of Shakespeare's most beloved comedies -- offering up lively humor, intersperced with thoughtful meditations on politics, honor and the nature of shame.  Plus, no one dies!  Yay! 

Whedon's take on Much Ado is shot in a very arty black and white which renders up each face in loving, graphic detail; perfectly complimenting the slamming wit of our beloved bard. 

by: 
Arra, Lakewood Library

History books don't have to be boring.  Try reading about history in a new format:

          

by: 
Tana, Arvada Library

Butterflies are beautiful, delicate and very, very HUNGRY little beasties!  You should do your very best to cater them a lovely meal -- somewhere nice... like the alley behind your house!  Or maybe that yucky patch of dirt on the corner of Somewhere and There.  Or maybe over yonder in that big empty field behind Great Wall of Ugly -- just toss a SeeD Bomb full of LoVe and watch the MAGIC happen!* 

Join us at Arvada Library today to let your Inner Gardening Guerilla out -- Make SEED BOMBS and spread the BEAUTY!

Tuesday, May 28th @ 4:30pm.

*MAGIC not instantaneous.  They're seeds.  They take time. But you know what I mean...  EVENTUALLY it will be MAGICAL. Or at least pretty.   

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